Meet the Pioneers of the Wearables Boom 2.0

Wearable devices like Google Glass and Fitbit have fuelled public interest in the internet of things of recent years but the best is still to come. The full range of capabilities of interconnected devices, encompassing the cloud, big data and the smartphone revolution will include much more than providing users with real-time health data and augmented reality experiences. By 2025 wearable technologies and widespread pervasive connectivity will have a huge impact on our daily lives from non-invasive patient monitoring, to wearable chargers, to future navigation devices. 

 But how can we now move beyond the first wave of wearables? At the Internet of Things Summit in San Francisco, on November 6-7, experts will explore the rapidly expanding market of wearable technologies, and how we can make future devices smarter and more efficient. Sessions focused on wearables include:

  •  Personalised Health & The Connected Self
  • Technology Under Your Skin: Printed Sensors & Embeddables
  • Fitness Trackers, Society & the Workplace
  • Smart Textiles - Our Future Fabric
  • How the IOT is Revolutionizing Health & Wellbeing
  • Energy & Computers Without Batteries

Notable wearables companies in attendance will include Jawbone, a world-leader in consumer technology and wearable devices, building hardware products and software platforms powered by data science. Abe Gong, Data Scientist at Jawbone, will explore the key role the IOT is playing  in the evolution of human health and behaviour. He says:

 “In contrast to most of the medical instruments developed in the last century, many new sensors and devices give people tools to understand and influence their own health. This new knowledge is already sending ripple effects through the power structures of health, medicine, and behavioural science—and the revolution is just getting started.”

Join us in San Francisco for the Internet of Things Summit! 
We’ve just over 2 weeks to go, get your passes now: re-work.co/internet-of-things

Smart Phones Are the Key to Sustainable Off-Grid Power

BuffaloGrid brings power as a service to off grid communities enabling all those mobile phones which the UN identified as the biggest contributors to economic growth in these regions. Now power is just a text message away.

Daniel Beccerra is Managing Director of Buffalo Grid, we caught up with him ahead of his appearance at RE.WORK Cities Summit London:

What does your work have to offer for progress on social development and human rights issues in developing-world cities?

Our mission at BuffaloGrid is to bring power and connectivity to the rural world.

Mobile phones are a global success. Out of the world’s estimated 7 billion people, 6 billion have access to mobile phones (GSMA Greenpower). More people have access to mobile phones than toilets (UN). The photo attached is from a remote village in Uganda, showing the response when we asked who had a mobile phone. When we asked who had power for charging their phone, everyone put their hand down.

Mobile phones are much more widespread than power to charge them. For example, more than 80% of Ugandans have a mobile phone, but less than 5% have access to power. Worldwide, more than half a billion people have mobile phones but no way to charge them (GSMA). Off-grid people solve this problem by walking many miles to a local charge shop, paying a quarter of a day’s wages, and leaving their phone for a half day. They do this twice a week.

Mobile phones for the developing world are a vast and valuable market. The UN considers mobile phones to be the biggest contributor to economic growth for the emerging economies of Sub Saharan Africa and South East Asia. The benefit of mobile phones is so huge that despite costing a day per week to charge, and another day’s wages to buy airtime, they are still the biggest contributor to growth! (UN)

Mobile phones are valuable because they give people access to opportunities. For example, subsistence farming adds very little value to an economy. In Sub-Saharan Africa, agriculture adds only 3% to the nations GDP (service industries add 71%), but most people are employed in agriculture. In Uganda more than 80% of the workforce is employed in agriculture. Before mobile phones, it was hard to sell export crops or find any other work opportunity. Mobile phones make it possible for people who had no possibilities beyond feeding their family, to engage in commerce with people outside of their local community and on the other side of the world - how do we know this? Because at BuffaloGrid we are engaging in business with Ugandans this way right now. And if mobile phones can have this effect, think about the opportunities that low-cost smartphones present.

Smartphones are how the bottom billion will know the internet, but new smartphones are too expensive. There is a glut of second-hand smartphones that are presently unused - in developed countries most people are on to their second or third smartphone. The older generation of smartphones are sitting in drawers, gathering dust. Most are serviceable for web browsing, but their batteries are near end of life, and last only a day or less.

Developing countries are unable to use these second-hand phones as they did with second-hand feature phones. Their power demands are too high for off-grid communities and data networks are not available. The 2G networks in most developing world locations have too little bandwidth for large scale internet use. 3G networks have a too short a range. 4G networks will not roll out for many years, and most existing smartphones are not 4G compatible.

A charging system that has onboard WiFi could bridge the gap. An Internet-enabled charging could provide everything that off-grid people need, to get online using second-hand smartphones. Power comes from the charging system’s solar cells. Internet comes via satellite link or 4G LTE, and is transmitted locally over WiFi, enabling last generation smartphones to access the internet.

Internet-enabled charging systems could act as sentinels, providing networks with the information needed to roll out data networks. The charging systems could collect data on the power and internet they provide, which can be remotely monitored. Once enough demand has been demonstrated, networks can quickly calculate where a data enabled base-station is feasible.

The more connected the world is the better it will become. Connectivity brings development, growth and peace and at BuffaloGrid we are working hard to make the world a better place.

Daniel Beccerra will be speaking at RE.WORK Cities Summit in London on 4-5 December. For more info & to register visit re-work.co/cities

Join the conversation on Twitter with @BuffaloGrid & @teamrework using #REWORKcities

Mind Altering Wearables & Tackling Ebola with Big Data - Recommended Reads (Week Ending 19th Oct)

The tech world is rapidly evolving and it’s hard to keep up! To help you get up to date we’ve rounded up the best tech and innovation articles from this past week that you should be reading.

These Algae Farms Cover The Walls Of Buildings And Soak Up Carbon

“Micro-organisms like algae are like bacteria—it’s one of those things that in our culture people try to get rid of,” Griffa says. “But algae offer incredible potential because of their very intense photosynthetic activity.” Algae take in carbon dioxide and produce oxygen while growing. Compared to a tree, micro-algae are about 150 to 200 times more efficient at sucking carbon out of the air.”

The IoT Will Be a Living Global Nervous System

"The main challenges to the integration of the IoT into our current systems is based on reconciling sustaining business model mindsets with entire new modes of connecting with other networks of companies, products and services. Device discovery, date ownership, and managing the complexity of interacting services from an end-user perspective will also be critical deciding factors in the Internet of Things success."

Ebola: Can big data analytics help contain its spread?

Big data analytics is about bringing together many different data sources and mining them to find patterns,” says Frances Dare, managing director of Accenture Health. 

"In the case of Ebola, analysts studying big data sets could also analyse potential sanitation challenges and whether regional environmental factors such as weather could impact the rate at which the disease is spread."

Bomb detection: Fruit flies can sniff out explosives with their acute sense of smell

"By monitoring how quickly each neurone fired, the researchers were able to assess which smells elicited the strongest reactions from the flies. They then used a computer program to simulate the part of the fly’s brain used for recognition to show that the receptor responses contained enough information to recognise odours."

How 3-D Printing is Transforming Everything from Medicine to Manufacturing

"The technology has the ­potential to alter—even revolutionize—dozens of industries, from small-batch manufacturing to aerospace engineering, from prosthetics to reconstructive surgery and beyond. Within a decade, ­surgeons might even use 3-D printing to build organs for transplants and to harvest new nerve cells."

Thync’s neurosignalling wearable will change your mind — literally

"The device sends low-grade electronic or ultrasound signals to the cranial nerves, which send information to the brain. The Thync device can currently send three types of signal: one for calm, one for focus, and one for energy. You can control the type and intensity of the signal using an app on your phone."

Dolls, pets, drones: six ways that robots will change the way we live

"Digital animals, construction drones and furniture that is smart in all senses of the word are among the innovations that could soon be heading into, under and above our homes, roboticists revealed last week."

Driven by care needs, will it be the booming senior population that drives wider acceptance of robots?

"Personal robots could aid seniors with time consuming household tasks such as making a pot of tea, reaching for the salt, opening a jar, or microwaving food – tasks that could be frustrating if you have to wait around for help. Personal hygiene tasks such as showering or using the toilet can create an embarrassing dynamic between the elderly and the caretaker, and so also make ideal tasks for robot care assistants."

Check out our Linkedin showcase pages for more interesting links and articles:

Internet of Things 

Edtech 

Robotics 

Deep Learning 

Technology 

Cities

Health

The IoT Will Be a Living Global Nervous System

Trevor Harwood is the founder and CEO of Postscapes, a company that connects a vibrant network of early adopters and industry leaders in the Internet of Things (IoT) landscape through news, insider interviews, education and trend tracking.

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What is the greatest opportunity for IoT to positively impact business and society?

Put simply, the IoT will enable us to make better decisions. I think this could result in significant time savings and help curb our resource consumption. If we could trim 10-15% off our current resource usage based on IoT technologies this could have a huge compounding impact on our planet and society moving forward and a worthy goal to pursue.

What challenges does integrating IoT entail?

The main challenges to the integration of the IoT into our current systems is based on reconciling sustaining business model mindsets with entire new modes of connecting with other networks of companies, products and services. Device discovery, date ownership, and managing the complexity of interacting services from an end-user perspective will also be critical deciding factors in the Internet of Things success.

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How can we encourage a more bottom-up approach to IoT applications and innovation?

As a community we need to do a better job at surfacing and then highlighting the inevitable challenges the IoT brings with it. At the moment we are still in an exploration stage of the topic and once this settles down having a clear framework of issues and possibilities for the community to catalyze around will help to generate new bottom-up innovations.

We know we aren’t going to chance to innovate in the small cracks The Stacks leave us, there is no way that a top-down approach will scale along with the number of connected devices soon to be available to us. Innovations will naturally flow from the desire of people to tweak the system to their particular needs.

What are the key factors to plan for post-implementation of IoT - both the opportunities and challenges this entails?

I would recommend reading Kevin Kelly’s New Rules for the New Economy. It was written in 1999 but think most of its central tenants hold strong. A quick blurb from one of the chapters that I think will be a key mindset needed to be successful in IoT enabled world:

"As networks have permeated our world, the economy has come to resemble an ecology of organisms, interlinked and coevolving, constantly in flux, deeply tangled, ever expanding at its edges. As we know from recent ecological studies, no balance exists in nature; rather, as evolution proceeds, there is perpetual disruption as new species displace old, as natural biomes shift in their makeup, and as organisms and environments transform each other.

Both in our understanding of it, and in reality, the network economy is a place that harbors little harmony or stasis. Instead, it is a system that will increasingly demand flux and innovation. The art of judicious change, of the dangerous difference, will be rewarded in full.”

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Trevor will be speaking at RE.WORK Internet of Things Summit in San Francisco on 6-7 November. For more info & to register visit re-work.co/internet-of-things

Join the conversation on Twitter with @postscapes@teamrework using #IoT2014

Check out the full “What is the Internet of Things?” infographic by Postscapes here.

Here’s the latest news from the RE.WORK Team - October 2014

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3 Weeks until the Internet of Things Summit!

On November 6-7 we’re hosting the Internet of Things Summit at Broadway Studios in San Francisco. The summit will feature a wide range of speakers from startups to established companies to leading researchers, exploring how IOT technologies will affect the future of business and society, and some of the challenges we will face through integrating them. 

Sessions will include:

'Smart Textiles - Our Future Fabric' with Pierre-Alexandre Fournier, Co-Founder at Hexoskin a wearable health technology company based in Montreal and Quin Sandler, the Co-Founder of Plantiga, a company creating smart connected footwear;

A Fireside chat on the ‘Google Self-Driving Car’ with Jaime Waydo, Systems Engineer of the Self-Driving Car Program at Google [X] and Sarah Buhr, Writer at TechCrunch;

'Satellites, Global Data & Impact', exploring the potential impact of satellite-powered data on humanity with Chris Wake the Director of Operations at Spire.

Topics also include consumer wearables, personalised medicine, urban insfrastructure as well as the structures behind IOT, including energy usage, security and common standards. 

 VIEW THE AGENDA

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This week we held RE.WORK The Future of Robotics Forum!

There were fascinating presentations on how future robotics will be integrated into workplaces, school, hospitals and the home.

Robots to install underfloor insulation in draughty homes, bots for edutainment, intelliTables and tiny robust drones flying with real bees wings – tantalising glimpses of a technology on the cusp of commercialisation.

Read a great summary over on Robohub.

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Future Cities Will Be Living, Reactive & Think for Themselves

By 2050, 70% of the world’s population will live in cities. What will this really look like? How will our urban landscapes change? What impact will this have on infrastructure, communities and citizens?

At the RE.WORK Cities Summit we’ll explore how emerging technologies such as advancing robot-human interaction, digital installations, ‘living, responsive cities’, sensors and environmental monitoring, mobile robots, pocket drones, urban data collection and 3D printed materials will change our cities to ensure they are sustainable and efficient in the future.

The summit will take place at The Crystal, a sustainable cities initiative by Siemens, and one of the world’s greenest buildings. Industry leaders, entrepreneurs, innovators and startups will come together to explore the cutting-edge technologies on the horizon that are going to disrupt and inspire change for our future cities. Meet fellow innovators with the same passion to reshape our future cities.

View an overview of the event here

 VIEW THE AGENDA

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Other News not to be Missed!

Now You Can Tattoo Your Wearable Directly onto Your Skin

Data Transparency is Key to IoT Success: Florian Michahelles

Healthcare by drone, wearable personal trainers & disaster zone aids - some recommended reads

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We’re excited to be partnering with Big Data Made Simple for our upcoming events! A ‘one stop for everything you need to know about Big Data and Analytics’. Check out their work here.  

Wearables Empower People to Take Control of Their Health

With the Internet of Things Summit in San Francisco just one month away, we caught up with speaker Quin Sandler, Co-founder of Plantiga.

Plantiga are makers of connected performance apparel, their first product being Suspend, an ergonomic, app-connected shoe and mobile software system. Quin has been a serial entrepreneur for much of his life, known for founding Keystone Learning - a developer of propriety teaching techniques for learning challenged children. He has a passion for design, product development and mobility.

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What is the greatest opportunity in your industry to positively impact business and society?

We at Plantiga see wearables as a tool to monitor the human body, then relaying that contextual data for different things. This sensing will be everywhere, and embedded in everything. For now, a massive opportunity is in health, empowering individuals to take control of their lives and personal health. Another is in sport, with obvious benefits that come from people able to monitor performance data. For society as a whole, I think a huge opportunity is in helping make the workplace safer.

What challenges does integrating IoT entail? 

There will totally be growing pains associated with implementing this future. To us, a big one will be social acceptance - does it look good, does it feel good, how is my data being used by my bosses?

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How can we encourage a more bottom-up approach to IoT applications and innovation?

I think this trend is already happening. The more people embrace these technologies, bringing them to work, or when they play a sport, or when they go in and see their doctor- these things will change and move the industry forward.

Quin Sandler will be speaking at RE.WORK Internet of Things Summit in San Francisco on 6-7 November. For more info & to register visit re-work.co/internet-of-things

Join the conversation on Twitter with @plantiga & @teamrework using #IoT2014

Future Cities Will Be Living, Reactive & Think for Themselves

The Cities Summit, organised by RE.WORK, will take place over two days on 4-5 December, at The Crystal, London, and will showcase the opportunities of accelerating technologies and their impact on our urban areas.

By 2050, 70% of the world’s population will live in cities. What will this really look like? How will our urban landscapes change? What impact will this have on infrastructure, communities and citizens? At the RE.WORK Cities Summit we’ll explore how emerging technologies such as advancing robot-human interaction, digital installations, ‘living, responsive cities’, sensors and environmental monitoring, mobile robots, pocket drones, urban data collection and 3D printed materials will change our cities to ensure they are sustainable and efficient in the future.

The summit will take place at The Crystal, a sustainable cities initiative by Siemens, and one of the world’s greenest buildings. Industry leaders, entrepreneurs, innovators and startups will come together to explore the cutting-edge technologies on the horizon that are going to disrupt and inspire change for our future cities. Meet fellow innovators with the same passion to reshape our future cities.

Discussions will include:

  • Interactive Installations, Digital Interface & the Crowd
  • Automation in the City: Robotics & the Pocket Drone
  • Supplying Power to the Off-Grid World
  • Synthetic Biology & The Living City
  • Wellness, Happiness and Re-Imagining the City
  • Smart Cities: Where are we now and where are we headed?

Mirko Presser, Head of Research & Innovation at Smart City Lab, Alexandra Institute, said: “Sharing our experiences at high quality events should be a priority to all of us. I am looking forward to doing just that at RE.WORK Cities Summit in London.”

Oluwaseyi Sosanya, Founder, Sosafresh, who will be presenting the 3D Weaver at the Summit, said: "I am most looking forward to sharing my work with an audience from diverse backgrounds and the opportunity for true cross pollution of ideas."

The agenda will also feature:

Usman Haque, Founder, Umbrellium & Thingful. Trained as an architect, he has created responsive environments, interactive installations, digital interface devices and dozens of mass-participation initiatives throughout the world.

Daniel Becerra, Managing Director, Buffalo Grid. Buffalo Grid brings power as a service to off grid communities enabling all those mobile phones which the UN identified as the biggest contributors to economic growth in these regions.

Andrew Hudson-Smith, Director of the Centre for Advanced Spatial Analysis, University College London. Andrew’s contribution to knowledge and outreach in the fields of the Internet of Things, smart cities, big data, digital geography, urban planning and the built environment have been wide ranging with an impact strategy focused on policy, outreach and public understanding of science.

Alberto T. Estevez, Director, Genetic Barcelona Project. Alberto explores cities that learn from the ideas and advantages of nature and new technologies in science, biology and genetics that can give us the possibility to re-think and re-work our cities.

Anna Mavrogianni, Lecturer in Sustainable Building & Urban Design, The Bartlett, UCL. Anna’s research includes energy efficient retrofit technologies; building energy use modelling; the adaptation of the built environment to a warming climate; the impact of urban heat islands and climate change on energy use, thermal comfort and health.

Jonathan Steel, CEO, Change London. Jonathan has created a new model of technology-enabled not-for-profit organisation, which is helping to improve health, liveability, and economic outcomes for urban centres - primarily in London but increasingly in other cities.

Larissa Suzuki, PhD in Software Systems Engineering, University College London. Larissa will explore the architectural design and business models for ultra‐large and highly interconnected systems which have the power to orchestrate people, technology, and organizations into socio-technical ecosystems that remain, even on large scale, flexible and innovative.

Early Bird passes end tomorrow!

Discover the technologies on the horizon that are going to disrupt future cities! Book your tickets now to save: re-work.co/cities

Tickets for startups, students and academics are available for reduced rates. If you’d like to send a team, get in contact to see what discounts are available to you - email us hello@re-work.co

Now You Can Tattoo Your Wearable Directly onto Your Skin

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Joshua Windmiller, CEO of Electrozyme, is an internationally-recognized expert in printed biosensor technology. Electrozyme has developed a printed electrochemical sensor platform that enables the analysis of the chemical constituents of a wearer’s perspiration in a real-time, non-invasive fashion.

We had a quick Q&A with Joshua about the opportunities and challenges of implementing Internet of Things (IoT) technologies.

What is the greatest opportunity in your industry to positively impact business and society?

In the sensors domain, the ability to passively collect physiological and biochemical signatures will facilitate the presentation real-time insight into the user’s health and wellness. This, in turn, will empower the user with actionable information that directly seeks to solve the challenge of low-cost healthcare delivery, thereby allowing the individual to take proactive measures to prevent adverse outcomes.

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What challenges does integrating IoT entail? 

The two most critical obstacles to the proliferation of IoT are interoperability and security.

How can we encourage a more bottom-up approach to IoT applications and innovation? 

We are in need of technology developers who can direct their focus at the demonstration of new sensing capabilities and address the need for more power-efficient systems that feature power-scavenging capabilities. This is especially the case for sensor nodes, which are often deployed in difficult-to-access locations for remote monitoring, thereby making maintenance and battery changes a difficult proposition during their useful service life.

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What are the key factors to plan for post-implementation of IoT - both the opportunities and challenges this entails?

IoT is still in its infancy; planning for its post-implementation still remains a challenge owing to the lack of standardization and interoperability. However, some noteworthy areas of future development include tight integration of biometrics and advanced security measures to enable a greater degree of safety and reliability.

Joshua Windmiller will be speaking at RE.WORK Internet of Things Summit in San Francisco on 6-7 November. For more info & to register visit https://www.re-work.co/internet-of-things

Join the conversation on Twitter with @electrozyme & @teamrework by using #IoT2014

Data Transparency is Key to IoT Success: Florian Michahelles

Florian Michahelles is the head of research group of Web of Things at Siemens Corporation, Berkeley. Together with his team he investigates to smooth data exchange between the devices to eventually make machines smarter and collaborative.

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My current role at Siemens allows me to head the web of things research team in Berkeley. We investigate how web technologies and semantic technologies can be applied to the various Siemens business fields (industry automation, building technologies, health care & traffic management) in order to facilitate growth and new services.

Before, I headed the Auto-ID Labs research network at ETH Zurich in Switzerland where I focused on the development of an Internet of Things (IoT) architecture enabling new services in retail and supply-chain management.

What is the greatest opportunity in your industry to positively impact business and society?

As the greatest opportunity in our domain I see the automation of processes, auto-configuration of devices and the autonomous collaboration among machines by turning sensor-data and process information into actionable knowledge for machines. This should enable a more frictionless coexistence of systems and enable new services for society: more efficient use of resources, energy conservation and new services.

Discover the latest trends in robotics research and meet industry leaders & investors at RE.WORK The Future of Robotics.

Sessions will include: Commercialising Robotics, Public Perception, Technology Readiness, Routes to Market, Return on Investment, Robots in Human Environments, Smart Cities, Manufacturing & Automation, Transport, Assisted Living in Healthcare & more!

Join us at The Hub Westminster, London, on 14 October: re-work.co/workshops/future-of-robotics

Healthcare by drone, wearable personal trainers & disaster zone aids - Recommended Reads (week ending 28th Sept)

The tech world is rapidly evolving and it’s hard to keep up! To help you get up to date we’ve rounded up the best tech articles from this past week that you should be reading.

Fingertip sensor gives robot unprecedented dexterity

"Although there are several ways of measuring human tactile acuity, one is to determine how far apart two small bumps need to be before a subject can distinguish them just by touching; the answer is usually about a millimeter. By that measure, even the lower-resolution, robot-mounted version of the GelSight sensor is about 100 times more sensitive than a human finger."

Wearing the cure: Five diseases wearables are tackling

"A survey of the field suggests that new wearables currently show promise for addressing Alzheimer’s and dementia, diabetes, neuropathic pain, depression and macular degeneration."

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RE.WORK Technology Summit London 2014

Check out the summary for last week’s RE.WORK Technology Summit in London. We heard fascinating presentations on a wide range of emerging technologies including applications for swarm robotics in healthcare, ultrasonic haptic feedback, 3D printing educational projects, the future of virtual assistants, computational molecular design and much much more.

Office buildings are key to workers’ health, wellbeing and productivity

For architects and designers, the idea that buildings influence the health, wellbeing and productivity of their occupants is not new. But this type of thinking is still not influencing most design, financing and leasing decisions – beyond perhaps the odd high profile Silicon Valley tech company.

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Radio Waves Offer Cheap Gesture Detection on Smartphones

"The researchers say this kind of gesture recognition could be added to smartphones using antennas already within the phone or by printing additional antennas on a phone’s circuit board."

Delivering Health Care By Drone

"Could the use of technologies that distance health care providers from the first-hand experience of the suffering of those they care for (such as telemedicine platforms and other forms of “virtual visits” or self-care tools) lead to a collective “stumbling over lines” with unfortunate consequences? On one side of these lines is empathy and understanding of the nature of suffering, and on the other, a loss of that perspective."

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How technology is changing disaster relief

"The solution was to develop a technology that allows mobile phones to communicate directly with each other even where there is no network coverage, or when mobile masts have been knocked out of action - a system known as "mesh networking" … It is just one example of the dozens of technologies developed in the wake of Haiti to help relief efforts in disaster zones."

Wearables: The New Personal Trainer?

"We’re aiming beyond the basic action-reaction automations seen in proximity sensors and automatic doors. I believe the future of IoT tech is driven by predictive and effortless solutions that begin to simplify complex tasks and provide deeper insight."

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A Promising Step Toward Round-the-Clock Solar Power

The solar water splitter stores 12.3 percent of the energy in sunlight in the form of hydrogen. That might seem like a small amount, but consider that most solar cells convert only 16 percent of the energy in sunlight into electricity, without the added step of turning that energy into easy-to-store hydrogen.”

Signaling Post-Snowden Era, New iPhone Locks Out N.S.A.

"The policy described the encryption method used in iOS 8 as so deep that Apple could no longer comply with government warrants asking for customer information to be extracted from devices. “Unlike our competitors, Apple cannot bypass your passcode, and therefore cannot access this data,” the company said."

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The Future of Healthcare: Cancer Killing Robotic Swarms are just the Beginning

"Sabine Hauert designs swarms of nanobots for biomedical applications. Her research uses machine learning and crowdsourcing to create nanobot swarms for cancer applications such as the detection and treatment of tumours."

Crystal skin patch monitors cardiac health

"Beyond cardiovascular problems, the patch could also be used to take skin hydration levels, the team suggests, taking its applications into the commercial, cosmetic sector."

 

Check out our Linkedin showcase pages for more interesting links and articles:

Internet of Things 

Edtech 

Robotics 

Deep Learning 

Technology 

Cities

Health

Wearables: The New Personal Trainer?

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Peter Li is CEO and Co-Founder of Atlas Wearables, best known for their fitness tracker that replicates the experience of having a personal trainer. Peter’s background and focus revolve around data analytics and machine learning techniques that vastly improve user experience for wearable technologies.

We caught up with Peter ahead of the Internet of Things Summit San Francisco to hear his thoughts on the wearables and Internet of Things (IoT) industries.

What is the greatest opportunity in your industry to positively impact business and society? 

One of the most interesting opportunities to me in this industry is the potential of technology to simplify and automate impact and business and society. We’re aiming beyond the basic action-reaction automations seen in proximity sensors and automatic doors. I believe the future of IoT tech is driven by predictive and effortless solutions that begin to simplify complex tasks and provide deeper insight.

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What challenges does integrating IoT entail? 

I think privacy plays a big role here. I don’t think integration on its own spawns challenges but in the interest of protecting user data, integration between services creates risk. The challenge lies in maintaining security. 

 How can we encourage a more bottom-up approach to IoT applications and innovation?

I believe Indiegogo, Kickstarter, and the crowdfunding startups are creating very good opportunities for a bottom-up approach. Many companies are developing great platforms that enable DIYers to get their hands dirty! I think the next step involves an extension of software libraries on these hardware kits. The Apple Watch will likely enable many DIYers/Devs/App devs

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What are the key factors to plan for post-implementation of IoT - both the opportunities and challenges this entails?

In short, this new level of data creates a lot of opportunities for innovators to dig through and create new types of analytics. As with any new data stream there are similar challenges in privacy and security.

Peter Li will be speaking at RE.WORK Internet of Things Summit in San Francisco on 6-7 November. For more info & to register visit re-work.co/internet-of-things

Join the conversation on Twitter with @atlaswearables & @teamrework by using #IoT2014

The Future of Healthcare: Cancer Killing Robotic Swarms are just the Beginning

The RE.WORK Health Summit is to be held in Dublin, Ireland, and will bring together global experts to showcase the opportunities of accelerating technologies and their impact on health and medicine.

RE.WORK Health Summit will be held in Dublin on 12-13 February 2015, and will provide a unique opportunity to interact with leading scientists, entrepreneurs, physicians & exciting startups in the very same place. Meet fellow innovators with the same passion to change the world.

Discover cutting-edge technologies on the horizon from the world’s leading innovators & scientists. Learn from the experts in personalised medicine, medtech, biotech, neuromedicine, regenerative medicine and big data. Discover the future of health & medicine.

Topics to be covered include:

  • Personalised Medicine
  • Robotics
  • Diagnostics
  • Big Data
  • Synthetic Biology
  • Regenerative Medicine
  • 3D-Printing
  • Neuromedicine
  • Quantified Self

Following his appearance at the last RE.WORK summit, Aubrey de Grey featured in many national newspapers, such as The Times, The Independent and The Guardian, for his presentation sharing current and future developments in regenerative medicine, including the possibility of halting the menopause within the next 20 years. We also heard about world-changing technologies from Elaine Warburton of QuantuMDx, who have developed a device for rapid response and monitoring of outbreak areas to prevent spreading of diseases.

At the RE.WORK Health Summit, you can expect even more ground-breaking technologies with the potential to positively disrupt the future of healthcare and medicine. The initial speaker line-up includes:

 

  • Sabine Hauert, Lecturer in Swarm Robotics, University of Bristol, designs swarms of nanobots for biomedical applications. Her research uses machine learning and crowdsourcing to create nanobot swarms for cancer applications such as the detection and treatment of tumours.
  • Juan Moreno, Coordinator, Bioengineering Group, is part of the BioMot project which develops exoskeletons for humans to aid walking in unconstrained daily-life environments. The work in BioMot is founded on the idea that new interactive technologies, if based on a unified theoretical framework would enable positive co-adaptation of humans and wearable robots.
  • Vanessa Diaz, Senior Lecturer in Bioengineering, University College London, is an expert in computational biomedicine. The main focus of her scientific work is in the development and use of multi-scale computational tools and models in digital healthcare, especially in the cardiovascular field.
  • Stephen Dunne, Director, Neuroscience Research at Starlab, is currently leading the Neuroscience team at Starlab that also created Neuroelectrics, one of the world’s leading wireless, neuro-monitoring and neuro-modulation technology companies. Stephen and the team are now developing a new line of neuroscience data services focused on human experience, human performance and disease biomarkers.
  • Mario Ettore Giardini, Lecturer in Digital Health, University of Strathclyde, will present Peek, a toolkit that harnesses the capabilities of smartphones for testing eyes in any situation, which enables eye examinations in even the remotest of settings, simplifying management and monitoring of treatment anywhere in the world.

 

SUPER EARLY BIRD DISCOUNT ENDS THIS FRIDAY 26 SEPTEMBER – Book before the end of this week to save €350!

Super Early Bird passes are available until 26 September. For further information and to register, go to: re-work.co/health

Tickets for Startups, Students and Academics are available at reduced rates. 

Want to send a team from your company? We can offer you discounted rates - 20% off for 3+ and 30% off for 5+.  Email hello@re-work.co for group bookings or any other enquiries.

Visit the official event page here: re-work.co/health

What does the future hold for our cities?
Discover the latest breakthroughs in technology that are going to disrupt and inspire change for the cities of the future.
Early Bird passes end on 10 October! Book now: re-work.co/cities

What does the future hold for our cities?

Discover the latest breakthroughs in technology that are going to disrupt and inspire change for the cities of the future.

Early Bird passes end on 10 October! Book now: re-work.co/cities